About

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Dylan Anderson

I am an aspiring coastal scientist focused on erosion and flooding hazards in the 21st century.  Oceans are warming and sea levels are consequently rising around the world - and society is unprepared.  My work is focused on understanding how the coast will respond to these higher water levels, specifically using dynamic models to simulate coastal sediment transport.  I also use hydrodynamic models to quantify the frequency and water depths of future flooding in low-lying human-built environments. 

I am originally from New England, and a graduate of Boston College’s Geology and Geophysics program, which exposed me to the intricacies of synthesizing conclusions from complicated real-world environments.  I recognized that making meaningful contributions to the coastal realm would require many years immersing myself in focused courses on wave mechanics, extreme statistics, coastal engineering, and climate phenomena. 

I am now in my 5th year of a PhD at Oregon State University, advised by Peter Ruggiero.  My degree at OSU is in the Ocean and Coastal Engineering program, with a minor in oceanography, and a certificate program for teaching at the university level.  Along the way I have spent summers conducting fieldwork in Oregon and Washington (riding instrumented-jet skis in the nearshore), organized a large-scale flume experiment in the O.H. Hinsdale Wave Laboratory, and studied abroad with colleagues in Spain. 

Curriculum Vitae     Linkedin      ResearchGate

 

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PhD candidate studying coastal change in the Ocean and Coastal Engineering program at Oregon State University.

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